Welcome toThe Rothschild Archive'swebsite

Sources for business history: catalogues of bank files

Sources for art history: Catalogue of the pictures of Alfred de Rothschild 1901

Sources for yachting history: Plans for Nathaniel von Rothschild's yacht Veglia 1905

Sources for natural history: Walter 2nd Lord Rothschild and his zebra carriage: c.1910

Sources for global financial history: Map of lines of the Brazil Railway Company: c.1920

Sources for business history: index cards to bank files

Sources for social history: Rothschild Hospital Paris: 1920s

Sources for business history: detail of a Rothschild bond coupon

Sources for architectural history: Halton House: 1890s

Sources for the history of travel: Lionel de Rothschild's tours of Spain: 1909

Sources for local history: Tring Park: c.1900

Sources for Royal history: shooting party with Edward Prince of Wales: 1893

Sources for political history: Lionel de Rothschild: first Jewish MP: 1858

Sources for sporting history: St Amant winner of the Derby: 1904

Sources for local history: gardeners at Aston Clinton: 1899

Sources for Rothschild family history: Lionel de Rothschild's yacht Rhodora: 1927

Sources for London history: entrance to New Court: 1965

Sources for design history: plans for Lionel de Rothschild's Rolls-Royce: 1930

Sources for business history: Rothschild gold bars produced by the Royal Mint Refinery: 1930s

Sources for business history: letters of August Belmont Rothschild Agent in New York: 1860s

EABH Workshop, 10 November 2017, Zagreb, Croatia

10 November 2017

Zagreb, Coatia

The data dilemma: a risk or an asset?

Business, academic and regulator perspectives on the past, present and future of data in the finance sector.

Data about the finance sector is growing exponentially and storing it is becoming easier. Businesses are excited about the commercial possibilities of 'Big Data'; academics are relishing the research potential of deep data archives and regulators are hoping for a fuller view of systemic risk and stability. Will it all turn out well though? The current reality of massive data stores is often no more than massive cost and complexity. The workshop will explore how we got here with data and where we go next. Ultimately, can a meeting of business, academics and regulators resolve the data dilemma and find a way to turn a risk into an asset?"

The committee invites proposals focusing on the following questions:

-  Does more data make us better forecasters? Are we any better than Keynes at predicting systemic risk now that we have all this information?

-  Do economic policy makers make good use of historical data or is it too hard to do?

-  Forecasters of all descriptions (especially economic ones) are facing a popular backlash. They missed the financial crisis and got the short-term impact of Brexit wrong (possibly). Wasn’t more data meant to mean better predictions?

-  How can financial research catch up with the need to change its methods in order to be able to make the best possible use of ‚big data‘ (data mining, etc.)?

-  Which financial and/or academic institutions are using innovative and creative approaches towards research?

-  Which are the tools needed to do successful historical research in the future?

-  Which are the risks related to financial data? Which are the associated legal requirements for privacy, confidentiality, security and consumer protection?

Further infomation here »

Posted on the 11th July 2017
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