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Sources for business history: plans of New Court

Sources for art history: Catalogue of the pictures of Alfred de Rothschild 1901

Sources for yachting history: Plans for Nathaniel von Rothschild's yacht Veglia 1905

Sources for natural history: Walter 2nd Lord Rothschild and his zebra carriage: c.1910

Sources for global financial history: Map of lines of the Brazil Railway Company: c.1920

Sources for business history: index cards to bank files

Sources for social history: Rothschild Hospital Paris: 1920s

Sources for business history: detail of a Rothschild bond coupon

Sources for architectural history: Halton House: 1890s

Sources for the history of travel: Lionel de Rothschild's tours of Spain: 1909

Sources for local history: Tring Park: c.1900

Sources for Royal history: shooting party with Edward Prince of Wales: 1893

Sources for political history: Lionel de Rothschild: first Jewish MP: 1858

Sources for sporting history: St Amant winner of the Derby: 1904

Sources for local history: gardeners at Aston Clinton: 1899

Sources for Rothschild family history: Lionel de Rothschild's yacht Rhodora: 1927

Sources for London history: entrance to New Court: 1965

Sources for design history: plans for Lionel de Rothschild's Rolls-Royce: 1930

Sources for business history: Rothschild gold bars produced by the Royal Mint Refinery: 1930s

Sources for business history: letters of August Belmont Rothschild Agent in New York: 1860s

Archivist’s Choice: exhibition 'Collectionneuses Rothschild: Mécènes et donatrices d'exception', La Boverie museum, Liège

This November, we are pleased to launch the first in our new regular series of articles, 'Archivist's Choice' where a member of the Archive team chooses a document, artefact, or event and explores its significance and story.

Supporting cultural exhibitions: resources and research at The Rothschild Archive, London

The Rothschild Archive was established in 1978 by Victor, 3rd Lord Rothschild (1910-1990).  Having spent much of his life surrounded by academia, he recognised the potential of the Archive as an important resource to researchers.  In 1999 the ownership of the Archive was transferred to The Rothschild Archive Trust, an independent body of family members and advisers committed to securing the future of the collection and to developing its use by the academic community.  Today, one of the ways the Trust achieves this goal is by supporting museum exhibitions relating to the Rothschild family and their many interests.  Museums and archives, while having much in common, have many things which distinguish them from each other.  Over the last few years, The Rothschild Archive has had the pleasure of working with several outstanding museums. Read more here about our recent loans to exhibitions at The Jewish Museum Frankfurt and The Jewish Museum Vienna and the V&A.

It is always of great interest to see how items from ‘our’ collections items are used by curators to tell a  particular story.  Most recently the Archive has supported La Boverie museum in Liège, Belgium with the exhibition ‘The Rothschild collectors: Female patrons and donors par excellence.’ Designed in partnership with The Louvre, it introduces visitors to the world of the Rothschild family, in particular, the collections of certain women from the French side of the family. Since the 19th century, the Rothschild name has become synonymous with success in the world of finance, but also with intellectual and artistic wealth. This exhibition, which offers a fresh perspective, highlights the women of the family with their unique personalities.

Through a selection of over 350 works from around forty French institutions and private collections, visitors to the exhibition will encounter great artists, such as Fragonard, Chardin, Delacroix, Cézanne, Claudel, Rodin and Egon Schiele, but also Italian Renaissance paintings, collections of jewels and porcelain and even works of art from Africa and the Far East, a huge number of artworks that testify to the history of tastes and collecting throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

The exhibition focuses on nine members of the Rothschild family:

Charlotte, Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild (1825-1899)

Adèle, Baroness Salomon James de Rothschild (1843-1922)

Béatrice Ephrussi, née de Rothschild (1864-1934)

Alice von Rothschild (1847-1922)

Mathilde, Baroness Henri de Rothschild, née de Weisweiller (1874-1926)

Laura Thérèse, Baroness James Edouard de Rothschild (1847-1931)

Alix, Baroness Guy de Rothschild, née Schey von Koromla (1911–1982)

Cécile de Rothschild (1913-1995)

Liliane, Baroness Elie de Rothschild, née Fould-Springer (1916-2003)

Open to the public until 26 February 2023, the exhibition includes 19 images from the photograph collections of The Rothschild Archive Collection, featuring exterior views of Rothschild properties, portraits of family members, and interior views of family collections in situ.  The Curators hope the images will help guide visitors through the exhibition, putting the objects into context.

More information about the exhibition is available here.

Charlotte Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild (1825-1899) was a prolific and accomplished artist and discerning collector of art.

Charlotte Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild (1825-1899) was a prolific and accomplished artist and discerning collector of art.

Charlotte Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild (1825-1899) restored the Abbaye des Vaux-de-Cernay where she housed her collections of medieval and Renaissance objects.

Charlotte Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild (1825-1899) restored the Abbaye des Vaux-de-Cernay where she housed her collections of medieval and Renaissance objects.